#Immediacy on speech making

I found an elderly, battered vehicle which was cheap and calculated that ...

I found an elderly, battered vehicle which was cheap and calculated that even with tax and insurance I would save money over daily hiring if the van lasted six months or more. 'I bought the van and, in fact, it lasted for a year, by, which time my cash flow was good enough for me to lease a new van. I still hire other vehicles from time to time when I have an unusually large load.

Such loads are infrequent, and it does not pay me to lease a large vehicle as well as the van.' Lessons from Phillip's experience Whether he consciously realized it or not, Phillip carried out the first analysis required to determine the type of transport he needed. This was to look at the 'delivery demand' of his business.

This demand can be one or more of the following types: • LOCAL URGENT fresh-cut flowers. • LOCAL NON-URGENT eg repaired furniture. • LOCAL REGULAR - eg supplies to retailers.

• LOCAL OCCASIONAL eg deliveries to private individuals. • Online - Nationwide / World There can also be combinations of the above such as the delivery of fresh-cut flowers to a retail florist's shop.

These will be URGENT and also needs to be REGULAR. The same types of delivery demand can be applied to DISTANT deliveries. Phillip decided that his deliveries were non-urgent and occasional, so hiring a van on an occasional basis would meet his needs and avoid capital expenditure and overheads. So step 1 is to identify the nature of the delivery demand and decide the cheapest way to meet it.

Some of the alternatives available which avoid capital expenditure are: Distribution Costs; Hired vehicles self-drive; Road carriers / couriers Post Office Should your product, and the necessary service to customers, suit any of these methods they should be seriously considered. Some of the largest manufacturing companies use common carriers either exclusively or in combination with their own vehicles having examined the costs involved. The basis of your decision will be a costing which compares the charges for outside services with the expense of running your own vehicle. Your own vehicle will incur a number of fixed costs which must be met regardless of the number of journeys you make or kilometres covered.

These fixed costs are: • Lease or depreciation costs • Tax • Insurance Garaging In ...

These fixed costs are: • Lease or depreciation costs • Tax • Insurance Garaging In addition, variable costs will be incurred depending on the mileage covered.

These var... read more

Having worked out the total cost of an owned or leased vehicle, ...

Having worked out the total cost of an owned or leased vehicle, the businessperson can compare this cost with th... read more

'To my astonishment,' said Roger, 'the lorry shot out into the main ...

'To my astonishment,' said Roger, 'the lorry shot out into the main road and, if I have not braked very hard indeed, would have taken the front off my car.' Roger then added, 'That dec